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Updated: 8 hours 40 min ago

CFP Digital Classicist London, summer 2018 seminar

Fri, 16/02/2018 - 13:20

The Digital Classicist invites proposals for the summer 2018 seminar series, which will run on Friday afternoons in June and July in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London.

We would like to see papers that address the tension between standardisation and customisation in digital and other innovative and collaborative classics research. The seminar encompasses all areas of classics, including ancient history, archaeology and reception (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean). Papers from researchers of all levels, including students and professional practitioners, are welcome.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend). To submit a paper, please email an abstract of up to 300 words as an attachment to valeria.vitale@sas.ac.uk by Monday, March 19th, 2018.

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EpiDoc & EFES training workshop, London April 9–13, 2018

Thu, 25/01/2018 - 16:00

We invite applications for a five-day training workshop in text encoding for epigraphy and papyrology, and publication of ancient texts, at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 9–13, 2018.

The training will be offered by Gabriel Bodard (ICS), Martina Filosa (Köln), Simona Stoyanova (ICS) and Polina Yordanova (ICS/Sofia) and there will be no charge for the workshop. Thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, a limited number of bursaries are available to assist students and other unfunded scholars with the costs of travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice, recommendations and tools for the digital editing and publication of ancient texts based on TEI XML. EFES (github.com/EpiDoc/EFES) is a publication platform closely geared to EpiDoc projects and designed for use by non-technical editors. No expert computing skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek/Latin or other ancient language, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk, by Feb 28, 2018 including the following information:

  1. a brief description of your reason for interest
  2. your relevant background and experience
  3. If you would like to request a bursary, estimate how much you would need.
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“Digital Editions, Digital Corpora, and new Possibilities for the Humanities in the Academy and Beyond” – NEH Institute – Tufts University, July 2018

Fri, 19/01/2018 - 08:15

This is a second request for applications for a NEH Institute at Tufts University in July 2018. Deadline is February 1st.

The Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University invites applications to “Digital Editions, Digital Corpora, and new Possibilities for the Humanities in the Academy and Beyond” a two-week NEH Institute for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities (July 16-27, 2018). This institute will provide participants the opportunity to spend two intensive weeks learning about a range of advanced new methods for annotating textual sources including but not limited to Canonical Text Service Protocols, linguistic and other forms of textual annotation and named entity analysis. By the end of the institute, participants will have concrete experience applying all of these techniques not just to provided texts and corpora but to their own source material as well.

Faculty, graduate students, and library professionals are all encouraged to apply and international participants are welcome. Applications are due by February 1, 2018.

Full application information regarding the application process may be found here:
https://sites.tufts.edu/digitaleditions/applications/

For more information, please visit the institute website: https://sites.tufts.edu/digitaleditions or send an email to perseus_neh@tufts.edu

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Survey on Digital Humanities collaborations

Mon, 27/11/2017 - 11:36

Posted for Max Kemman:

A distinguishing feature of DH is the collaboration between humanists and computational researchers. As part of my PhD research on digital history practices, I therefore am conducting an online survey to investigate the practices of collaboration. If you are part of a DH collaboration, I would like to kindly ask you to participate in this survey.

This survey is held to gain an overview of how collaborations in digital history and digital humanities are organised. Questions will focus on the organisation of people in the collaboration, the physical space, and the time frame of the collaboration. Filling out the survey should take about 10 minutes.

All data will be reported anonymously. The anonymous data will be made available open access later.

To participate in the survey, please follow www.maxkemman.nl/survey
To learn more about the study, please see www.maxkemman.nl/aboutsurvey

If you have any questions or comments, do not hesitate to contact me via max.kemman@uni.lu.

Max Kemman MSc
PhD Candidate
University of Luxembourg
Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH)

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DCO 3,2 (2017) is out!

Thu, 16/11/2017 - 10:21

A new special issue of the Digital Classics Online journal was published a few days ago, and it contains a selection of papers presented at the Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin during its first four years (2012-2015).

Table of Contents: Editorial

M. Romanello, M. Trognitz, U. Lieberwirth, F. Mambrini, F. Schäfer. A Selection of Papers from the Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin (2012-2015), pp. 1-4. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.36870.

Articles

P. Hacıgüzeller. Collaborative Mapping in the Age of Ubiquitous Internet: An Archaeological Perspective, pp. 5-16. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35670.

A. Trachsel. Presenting Fragments as Quotations or Quotations as Fragments, pp. 17-27. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35671.

G. Bodard, H. Cayless, M. Depauw, L. Isaksen, K.F. Lawrence, S.P.Q. Rahtz†. Standards for Networking Ancient Person data: Digital approaches to problems in prosopographical space, pp. 28-43. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.37975.

R. Varga. Romans 1 by 1 v.1.1 New developments in the study of Roman population, pp. 44-59. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35822.

U. Henny, J. Blumtritt, M. Schaeben, P. Sahle. The life cycle of the Book of the Dead as a Digital Humanities resource, pp. 60-79. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35896.

K. E. Piquette. Illuminating the Herculaneum Papyri: Testing new imaging techniques on unrolled carbonised manuscript fragments, pp. 80-102. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.39417.

T. Roeder. Mapping the Words: Experimental visualizations of translation structures between Ancient Greek and Classical Arabic, pp. 103-123. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35951.

F. Elwert, S. Gerhards, S. Sellmer. Gods, graves and graphs – social and semantic network analysis based on Ancient Egyptian and Indian corpora, pp. 124-137. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.36017.

R. Da Vela. Social Networks in Late Hellenistic Northern Etruria: From a multicultural society to a society of partial identities, pp. 138-159. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.39433.

 

 

 

 

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