Audio-visual interaction (synchronous)

project: Paradox of Medieval Scotland (PoMS)

The period between 1093 and 1286 laid the foundations for modern Scotland. At its start, the king of Scots ruled no more than a small east coast realm between Lothian and Moray. At its end, his authority extended over the whole area of modern Scotland apart from the Northern Isles. During the same period, Scotland’s society and culture was transformed by the king implanting a new nobility of Anglo-Norman origin and establishing English influenced structures of law and government. [read more]

project: London Theatre Bibliography (LTB)

This project combines two independent, but mutually supportive, projects which have complementary outputs: the need for a systematic and complete edition of all pre-1642 manuscript and printed records relating to the eight early Middlesex/Westminster theatres north of the Thames, and the complementary need for an aggregated bibliography which locates, assesses, and digests all printed transcriptions of pre-1642 documents relating to these theatres. [read more]

project: Buried treasure: rediscovering the Lord Chamberlain's collection of plays

The project began upon the long-overdue cataloguing of the Lord Chamberlain's collection from 1852 onwards. The pilot covered the decade to 1863. The collection for that period numbers about 3000 plays, including for example the British versions of Uncle Tom's Cabin and many farces and pantomimes with political implications around issues such as first-wave feminism. Cultured mid-Victorians agreed with G. H. Lewes that 'drama is extinct as literature' and ignored the new performance culture; these plays have therefore never been considered in either literary or social histories. [read more]

project: World Oral Literature Project

The World Oral Literature Project is an urgent global initiative to document and make accessible endangered oral literatures before they disappear without record. Established at the University of Cambridge in 2009, the project aspires to become a permanent centre for the appreciation and preservation of oral literature and collaborate with local communities to document their own oral narratives. [read more]

project: Capturing the past, preserving the future: digitisation of the national review of live art video collection

The Capturing the Past, Preserving the Future project has the following aims: To preserve for posterity the unique research materials contained in the National Review of Live Art Video Archive by digitising and maintaining the entire collection; To create an interactive and searchable on-line catalogue, including selected copyright-cleared examples of its holdings; To promote the enhanced research facility amongst the UK higher education, national and international performance research and practitioner communities; Readiness for developing curated programmes. [read more]

project: Records of Early English Drama, Middlesex/Westminster: Eight Theatres north of the Thames

This project focuses on two fundamental research problems: the need for a systematic and complete edition of all pre-1642 manuscript and printed records relating to the eight early Middlesex/Westminster theatres north of the Thames (1642 being the date of the closure of the London theatres by the authorities); the complementary need for a widely-available aggregated bibliography which locates, assesses, and digests all later printed transcriptions of pre-1642 documents relating to these theatres. [read more]

project: Medieval Warfare on the Grid: The Case of Manzikert

The Medieval Warfare on the Grid project (MWGrid) employs e-science methods and tools to support historical research into logistics of medieval war. The battle of Manzikert (modern Malazgirt, Turkey) in 1071, between the Byzantine Empire and the Seljuk Turks, is the subject of this investigation. This key event, which paved the way for Turkish settlement in eastern Anatolia, has been previously studied through comparative historical analysis. However, due to limited sources and the lack of comprehensive analytical methods, its logistics remain a subject of speculation. [read more]

project: Virtual Kemet: an African-centred Egyptian gallery for prisons

Since 2003 Dr Sally-Ann Ashton, an Egyptologist and Senior Assistant Keeper in the Department of Antiquities at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge has worked with prison education departments as part of an outreach programme. In order to expand her work and to explore the potential for using museum collections as an integral part of prison education, she was granted leave of absence from her post from September 2007 to September 2009. The project focused on Dr Ashton’s fieldwork and research, and the Egyptian and Nubian collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum. [read more]

project: Digital Himalaya Project

The Digital Himalaya project was designed by Professor Alan Macfarlane and Dr Mark Turin as a strategy for archiving and making available valuable ethnographic materials from the Himalayan region. The Digital Himalaya project had three primary objectives: 1. to preserve in a digital medium archival anthropological materials from the Himalayan region that were quickly degenerating in their current forms, including films in various formats, still photographs, sound recordings, field notes, maps and rare journals 2. [read more]
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