Heads-up digitising and interactive tracing

project: The Prehistoric Stones of Greece: a resource from field-survey

The Prehistoric Stones of Greece (SOG) set out to enhance the research value of survey projects conducted in Greece that had recovered Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic materials. SOG’s focus was to establish a database of stone tools and prehistoric lithics generally and by drawing this material into a common format enhance the resource for a variety of archaeological purposes; in particular academic research and heritage management. [read more]

project: Regnum Francorum Online

Regnum Francorum Online: interactive maps and sources of early medieval Europe, is a geospatial database with the aim of referencing historical events of Late Antiquity and Early Medieval (western) Europe to evidence in source-documents, compiling meta-data about the events, such as time, space and agency, and visualizing the events on interactive maps. This far, meta-data about more than 14.000 events are maintained in the database and avilable for further temporal and spatial analysis. [read more]

project: A Vision of Britain through Time

This website presents the history of Great Britain through places between 1801 and 2001. It includes maps, statistical trends, a gazetteer of British administrative units, on-line versions of a selection of tables and early printed text from some of the published Census Reports as well as historical descriptions of places and journeys. The site is free to use and does not require any registration. [read more]

project: Great Britain Historical GIS project

The Great Britain Historical Geographical Information System is a unique digital collection of information about Britain's localities as they have changed over time. Information comes from census reports, historical gazetteers, travellers' tales and historic maps, assembled into a whole that is much more than the sum of its parts. [read more]

project: Montréal l'avenir du passé (MAP)

Montréal l'avenir du passé (MAP) was established in 2000 to create an historical GIS research infrastructure for 19th and 20th century Montréal. We have digitized six highly detailed historical maps representing all buildings in the city for 1825, 1846, 1880, 1912, 1949 and 2000. The first three and last have been geo-referenced and we have successfully "peopled" them by linking at the street-scape (1846) or lot level (1880 & 2000) census returns, tax records, city directories and a wide variety of non-routinely generated sources. [read more]

project: Stonehenge Riverside Project

The Stonehenge Riverside Project was initiated in 2003 with the overall aim of better understanding Stonehenge within its changing monumental and natural landscape context, especially through investigation of the hypothesis that Stonehenge (in its Phase 3) formed one half of a larger complex as a stone circle associated with the dead, in contrast to a timber circle associated with the living at Durrington Walls. After five years of field investigations (landscape survey, geophysics, earthwork survey, excavation) and re-appraisal of previous interventions within the Stonehenge landscape, the [read more]

project: Mapping the medieval urban landscape: Edward I's 'new towns' of England and Wales

This project employed modern spatial technologies to explore how towns were formed in the middle ages. Its focus was on a group of 'new towns' established in England and Wales in the later thirteenth century during the reign of King Edward I. [read more]

project: The British archaeological expedition to the ancient emporium at Vetren-Pistiros, central Bulgaria

The project consists of preliminary geophysical prospection (1999-2001), a programme of limited excavation (30 sq metres), accompanied by faunal, organic, and metallurgical analyses (1999-2008), whose aim is to create a continuous, dated sequence of activities at the late Iron Age river port at Adjiyska Vodenitsa, near Vetren, plausibly identified with ancient Pistiros. This abandoned site, inundated by the River Maritsa in the second century BCE, provides a unique opportunity to study the symptoms of economic and cultural exchange between southeastern Europe and the Mediterranean at a tim [read more]

project: The Pompey Project: the evolution, structure and legacy of the Theatre of Pompey

The first scientific study of Rome’s first permanent theatre. Comprehensive documentation of all surviving remains, supplemented by new limited excavation at specific points targeted by our initial analysis. Creation of a definitive series of site-plans, sections, elevations keyed to a complete photographic record, and measured drawings. We have prepared an extensive archaeological register recording the details of every known artefact discovered on the site of the theatre complex for the past five centuries. [read more]
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