Desktop publishing and pre-press

tool: Omeka

Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Omeka falls at a crossroads of Web Content Management, Collections Management, and Archival Digital Collections Systems. Omeka is designed with non-IT specialists in mind, allowing users to focus on content and interpretation rather than programming. It brings Web 2.0 technologies and approaches to academic and cultural websites to foster user interaction and participation. It makes top-shelf design easy with a simple and flexible templating system. Its robust open-source developer and user communities underwrite Omeka’s stability and sustainability. Omeka allows users to publish cultural heritage objects, extend its functionality with themes and plugins, and curate online exhibits with digital objects.
Features: 
Methods relating to this toolCategory
Cataloguing and indexingData structuring and enhancement
Collaborative publishingData publishing and dissemination
Desktop publishing and pre-pressData publishing and dissemination
General project managementStrategy and project management
General website developmentData publishing and dissemination
Interface designData publishing and dissemination
Resource sharingData publishing and dissemination
Lifecycle stage:
Alternate tool(s):

DSpace

project: 19th- and Early 20th-Century Annotated Editions of String Music: Bibliographical Problems, Editorial Content and Implications for Performance Practice

Nineteenth and early twentieth-century annotated editions of earlier string music have generally been scorned in recent decades by performers, even those who specialise in historically-informed performance, and have received little attention from scholars. Greater emphasis has been placed on Urtexts, which seek to present the composer's approved notation as the authoritative text of the work. [read more]

project: London Theatre Bibliography (LTB)

This project combines two independent, but mutually supportive, projects which have complementary outputs: the need for a systematic and complete edition of all pre-1642 manuscript and printed records relating to the eight early Middlesex/Westminster theatres north of the Thames, and the complementary need for an aggregated bibliography which locates, assesses, and digests all printed transcriptions of pre-1642 documents relating to these theatres. [read more]

project: Turning owners into actors: Possessive morphology as subject-indexing in languages of the Bougainville region

A fundamental communicative task for all languages is to show which participant in a sentence is the subject. Languages have various ways of identifying the subject, including word-order, agreement, and case-marking. However, there is another unique and strange method, almost entirely unknown until now, found only in Northwest-Solomonic (NWS), a group of Oceanic languages of the Solomon Islands and Bougainville. In some constructions, these languages indicate subject using word-forms normally indicating possessors of nouns. [read more]

project: Online searchable item level catalogue and sample digital surrogate of the Archigram archives

The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a major new research resources that makes the work of the seminal 1960s-70s British architectural group, Archigram, available free online for public viewing and academic study. The extraordinary influence of Archigram is internationally acknowledged through the award of the RIBA Gold Medal in 2002, exhibitions, books, and through their role in shaping many of the world's greatest contemporary architects and buildings. [read more]

project: Performance as a medium of learning in museums and at heritage sites - an investigation

The PERFORMANCE, LEARNING AND HERITAGE research project is an investigation into the uses and impact of performance as a medium of learning in museums and at historic sites. The Centre for Applied Theatre Research (CATR) undertook research into the increasing and varied use being made of theatre and other drama-based activity as interpretive tools with visitors to museums and historic sites - an expanding but relatively under-researched field of performance practice. [read more]

project: Who Were the Nuns?

The project is a prosopographical study of the English convents in exile during the period 1600-1800 when it was illegal to be a nun in Britain. Key research questions include a broad response to the question 'Who were the nuns?' This involves locating the members in their family, religious, political and economic context and identifying the support networks sustaining the convents over two centuries. [read more]

project: The Prehistoric Stones of Greece: a resource from field-survey

The Prehistoric Stones of Greece (SOG) set out to enhance the research value of survey projects conducted in Greece that had recovered Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic materials. SOG’s focus was to establish a database of stone tools and prehistoric lithics generally and by drawing this material into a common format enhance the resource for a variety of archaeological purposes; in particular academic research and heritage management. [read more]

project: Germanic possessive -s : an empirical, historical and theoretical study

Two much-debated questions in recent theoretical linguistics concern the historical origin of grammatical markers and their synchronic status. Researchers have adduced key evidence for both from the evolution of English possessive -s and the related but subtly different constructions in Swedish and Dutch. What has not to date been attempted, and what the present proposal offers, is a systematic synchronic and diachronic comparison of these constructions across all three languages. [read more]
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