General website development

tool: Omeka

Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Omeka falls at a crossroads of Web Content Management, Collections Management, and Archival Digital Collections Systems. Omeka is designed with non-IT specialists in mind, allowing users to focus on content and interpretation rather than programming. It brings Web 2.0 technologies and approaches to academic and cultural websites to foster user interaction and participation. It makes top-shelf design easy with a simple and flexible templating system. Its robust open-source developer and user communities underwrite Omeka’s stability and sustainability. Omeka allows users to publish cultural heritage objects, extend its functionality with themes and plugins, and curate online exhibits with digital objects.
Features: 
Methods relating to this toolCategory
Cataloguing and indexingData structuring and enhancement
Collaborative publishingData publishing and dissemination
Desktop publishing and pre-pressData publishing and dissemination
General project managementStrategy and project management
General website developmentData publishing and dissemination
Interface designData publishing and dissemination
Resource sharingData publishing and dissemination
Lifecycle stage:
Alternate tool(s):

DSpace

project: James Mill's common place books

A three-year Collaborative Doctoral Award to transcribe and digitally publish James Mill's common place books, currently held in the archive of the London Library. The project is also researching James Mill's intellectual history, particularly the period of his close relationship with Jeremy Bentham (1808-1832). Because Mill was raised and educated in Scotland, there is also a significant Scottish Enlightenment context to the project. [read more]

project: Survey of Saint Dedications in Medieval Scotland

The chief aim of the project has been to construct a searchable database with a web-site interface recording and mapping dedications to saints in Scotland prior to 1560. It is hoped that the database will be useful as a research, reference and teaching tool for the study of saints’ cults and the wider examination of piety and devotion in medieval Scotland. The database has been compiled through a systematic survey of published sources relating to the medieval kingdom and a significant body of unpublished archival material. [read more]

project: Transnational Communities: towards a sense of belonging

Using both participatory action research and arts practice the project explored a sense of belonging, place and emplacement with four transnational communities who are defined as refugees/asylum seekers/undocumented people (in Derby, Leicester, Loughborough and Nottingham). The Long Journey Home artists in exile group based in Nottingham explored these themes and created a series of works for exhibition. Other regional universities supported us with; exhibition space, staff support, supporting artists and communities. [read more]

project: Unlocking the Celtic Collector; The Mind, Methods and Materials of Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912).

The Carmichael Watson collection in Edinburgh University Library, centred on the papers of the pioneering folklorist Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912), is the foremost collection of its kind in the country, and is crucial to understanding the customs, storytelling traditions, poetry, songs and general lore of the Gaelic-speaking areas of Scotland. The project will see an intense dissemination and research programme alongside development of a digital resource that will enable users to search fully-indexed catalogue descriptions, full text transcriptions and biographical records. [read more]

project: William Godwin's Diary

The project provides a digital edition of the diary of William Godwin (1756-1836). Godwin’s diary consists of 32 octavo notebooks. The first entry is for 6 April 1788 and the final entry is for 26 March 1836, shortly before he died. The diary is a resource of immense importance to researchers of history, politics, literature, and women’s studies. [read more]

project: Paradox of Medieval Scotland (PoMS)

The period between 1093 and 1286 laid the foundations for modern Scotland. At its start, the king of Scots ruled no more than a small east coast realm between Lothian and Moray. At its end, his authority extended over the whole area of modern Scotland apart from the Northern Isles. During the same period, Scotland’s society and culture was transformed by the king implanting a new nobility of Anglo-Norman origin and establishing English influenced structures of law and government. [read more]

project: Databasing key documents and narrative chronologies of artists' film and video distributors in the UK

The project created a database – the Film and Video Distribution Database (FVDD) – of chronological information and key documents relating to artists'/independent film and video distributors in the UK from the 1960s to date, which have been collected as part of two AHRB funded research projects. The database will be accessible via its own URL and via the British Artists Film and Video Study Collection. [read more]

project: Clergy of the Church of England Database (CCEd)

The Clergy of the Church of England Database aimed to construct a relational database containing the careers of all clergymen of the Church of England between 1540 and 1835. The Database brings together evidence about clerical careers from all 27 dioceses of England and Wales, which are held at 28 diocesan repositories and 23 other archives and libraries. [read more]

project: Strandlines

Strandlines Digital Community is a King’s College London initiative that explores one of London’s most famous streets, the Strand, and its past and present communities. The project brings together local residents, workers and visitors by means of storytelling. Using digital technologies and techniques from life writing – a creative field concerned with personal life stories – it seeks to foster a more active sense of community in the Strand area. [read more]
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