Interface design

tool: Omeka

Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Omeka falls at a crossroads of Web Content Management, Collections Management, and Archival Digital Collections Systems. Omeka is designed with non-IT specialists in mind, allowing users to focus on content and interpretation rather than programming. It brings Web 2.0 technologies and approaches to academic and cultural websites to foster user interaction and participation. It makes top-shelf design easy with a simple and flexible templating system. Its robust open-source developer and user communities underwrite Omeka’s stability and sustainability. Omeka allows users to publish cultural heritage objects, extend its functionality with themes and plugins, and curate online exhibits with digital objects.
Features: 
Methods relating to this toolCategory
Cataloguing and indexingData structuring and enhancement
Collaborative publishingData publishing and dissemination
Desktop publishing and pre-pressData publishing and dissemination
General project managementStrategy and project management
General website developmentData publishing and dissemination
Interface designData publishing and dissemination
Resource sharingData publishing and dissemination
Lifecycle stage:
Alternate tool(s):

DSpace

project: James Mill's common place books

A three-year Collaborative Doctoral Award to transcribe and digitally publish James Mill's common place books, currently held in the archive of the London Library. The project is also researching James Mill's intellectual history, particularly the period of his close relationship with Jeremy Bentham (1808-1832). Because Mill was raised and educated in Scotland, there is also a significant Scottish Enlightenment context to the project. [read more]

project: Survey of Saint Dedications in Medieval Scotland

The chief aim of the project has been to construct a searchable database with a web-site interface recording and mapping dedications to saints in Scotland prior to 1560. It is hoped that the database will be useful as a research, reference and teaching tool for the study of saints’ cults and the wider examination of piety and devotion in medieval Scotland. The database has been compiled through a systematic survey of published sources relating to the medieval kingdom and a significant body of unpublished archival material. [read more]

project: Unlocking the Celtic Collector; The Mind, Methods and Materials of Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912).

The Carmichael Watson collection in Edinburgh University Library, centred on the papers of the pioneering folklorist Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912), is the foremost collection of its kind in the country, and is crucial to understanding the customs, storytelling traditions, poetry, songs and general lore of the Gaelic-speaking areas of Scotland. The project will see an intense dissemination and research programme alongside development of a digital resource that will enable users to search fully-indexed catalogue descriptions, full text transcriptions and biographical records. [read more]

project: William Godwin's Diary

The project provides a digital edition of the diary of William Godwin (1756-1836). Godwin’s diary consists of 32 octavo notebooks. The first entry is for 6 April 1788 and the final entry is for 26 March 1836, shortly before he died. The diary is a resource of immense importance to researchers of history, politics, literature, and women’s studies. [read more]

project: London Theatre Bibliography (LTB)

This project combines two independent, but mutually supportive, projects which have complementary outputs: the need for a systematic and complete edition of all pre-1642 manuscript and printed records relating to the eight early Middlesex/Westminster theatres north of the Thames, and the complementary need for an aggregated bibliography which locates, assesses, and digests all printed transcriptions of pre-1642 documents relating to these theatres. [read more]

project: An electronic corpus of 15th century Castilian cancionero manuscripts; towards completion of the Dutton project

When Brian Dutton died prematurely in his 60th year (1994), he had completed his magnum opus, the seven-volume El cancionero castellano del siglo XV, in book format (Salamanca: Universidad, 1990-91), but although he had used electronic preparation of texts, he was unable to fulfil the dream of conversion to electronic usage. We can now present the online website version of the Dutton project of courtly verse, alongside our own project of the longer moralistic, didactic and religious Castilian verse of the fifteenth century. [read more]

project: Turning owners into actors: Possessive morphology as subject-indexing in languages of the Bougainville region

A fundamental communicative task for all languages is to show which participant in a sentence is the subject. Languages have various ways of identifying the subject, including word-order, agreement, and case-marking. However, there is another unique and strange method, almost entirely unknown until now, found only in Northwest-Solomonic (NWS), a group of Oceanic languages of the Solomon Islands and Bougainville. In some constructions, these languages indicate subject using word-forms normally indicating possessors of nouns. [read more]

project: The concert programmes database for the UK and Ireland (phase 1)

The Concert Programmes Project has created an online database of holdings of concert programmes to be found in selected libraries, archives and museums in the UK and Ireland. Currently, it holds 5,500 collections of music related ephemera held by 53 institutions including the British Library, the Royal College of Music, the Royal Academy of music, the national libraries of Scotland and Ireland and the Bodleian Library and Trinity College Dublin. It includes material from the end of the 17th century to the present day. [read more]

project: ROYAL: Illuminated Manuscripts of the Kings and Queens of England

The research project focuses on the Library's collection of medieval and Renaissance Royal illuminated manuscripts. The project, a collaboration with The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, will culminate in a major exhibition at the British Library in 2011-2012; the research will become part of the British Library's free illustrated online Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (CIM); and will also support and deliver a virtual exhibition and online introductory 'tours' of the Royal collection for visitors to the British Library website. [read more]
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