Resource sharing

tool: Omeka

Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Omeka falls at a crossroads of Web Content Management, Collections Management, and Archival Digital Collections Systems. Omeka is designed with non-IT specialists in mind, allowing users to focus on content and interpretation rather than programming. It brings Web 2.0 technologies and approaches to academic and cultural websites to foster user interaction and participation. It makes top-shelf design easy with a simple and flexible templating system. Its robust open-source developer and user communities underwrite Omeka’s stability and sustainability. Omeka allows users to publish cultural heritage objects, extend its functionality with themes and plugins, and curate online exhibits with digital objects.
Features: 
Methods relating to this toolCategory
Cataloguing and indexingData structuring and enhancement
Collaborative publishingData publishing and dissemination
Desktop publishing and pre-pressData publishing and dissemination
General project managementStrategy and project management
General website developmentData publishing and dissemination
Interface designData publishing and dissemination
Resource sharingData publishing and dissemination
Lifecycle stage:
Alternate tool(s):

DSpace

project: Paradox of Medieval Scotland (PoMS)

The period between 1093 and 1286 laid the foundations for modern Scotland. At its start, the king of Scots ruled no more than a small east coast realm between Lothian and Moray. At its end, his authority extended over the whole area of modern Scotland apart from the Northern Isles. During the same period, Scotland’s society and culture was transformed by the king implanting a new nobility of Anglo-Norman origin and establishing English influenced structures of law and government. [read more]

project: Databasing key documents and narrative chronologies of artists' film and video distributors in the UK

The project created a database – the Film and Video Distribution Database (FVDD) – of chronological information and key documents relating to artists'/independent film and video distributors in the UK from the 1960s to date, which have been collected as part of two AHRB funded research projects. The database will be accessible via its own URL and via the British Artists Film and Video Study Collection. [read more]

project: ROYAL: Illuminated Manuscripts of the Kings and Queens of England

The research project focuses on the Library's collection of medieval and Renaissance Royal illuminated manuscripts. The project, a collaboration with The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, will culminate in a major exhibition at the British Library in 2011-2012; the research will become part of the British Library's free illustrated online Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (CIM); and will also support and deliver a virtual exhibition and online introductory 'tours' of the Royal collection for visitors to the British Library website. [read more]

project: Online searchable item level catalogue and sample digital surrogate of the Archigram archives

The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a major new research resources that makes the work of the seminal 1960s-70s British architectural group, Archigram, available free online for public viewing and academic study. The extraordinary influence of Archigram is internationally acknowledged through the award of the RIBA Gold Medal in 2002, exhibitions, books, and through their role in shaping many of the world's greatest contemporary architects and buildings. [read more]

project: Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951

Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951 is the first comprehensive study of sculptors, related businesses and trades investigated in the context of creative collaborations, art infrastructures, professional networks and cultural geographies. The primary outcome of Mapping Sculpture 1851-1951 will be an open access online database on the GU website with postings of articles analyzing the results of the research. The database launch will coincide with exhibitions in the V&A's Gilbert Bayes Gallery and a collections display at the Henry Moore Institute. [read more]

project: Geographies of Orthodoxy: mapping the English-Pseudo-Bonaventuran Lives of Christ, c. 1350-1550

Geographies of Orthodoxy offers a new account of an English devotional phenomenon and affective literary tradition usually characterised as ‘pseudo-Bonaventuran’ by modern commentators. Geographies of Orthodoxy proposes to examine and make openly accessible through the latest electronic means the entire material remains of the anglophone pseudo-Bonaventuran tradition. [read more]

project: Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS)

The aim of the project is to use new technology to present and analyse the tradition of wisdom literatures in Greek and Arabic. Throughout antiquity and the middle ages collections of wise or useful sayings were created and circulated, as a practical response to the cost and inaccessibility of full texts in a manuscript age; the project will focus on those which collected moral and social advice. The compilation of these collections formed a crucial route by which ideas of reasonable behaviour and good conduct were disseminated over a huge area, and over many centuries. [read more]

project: World Oral Literature Project

The World Oral Literature Project is an urgent global initiative to document and make accessible endangered oral literatures before they disappear without record. Established at the University of Cambridge in 2009, the project aspires to become a permanent centre for the appreciation and preservation of oral literature and collaborate with local communities to document their own oral narratives. [read more]

project: CESAR IMAGES: a searchable online repository of French theatre images 1600-1800

The primary aim was to produce a single, coherent listing of all known theatre and related performances in France between 1600 and 1800, searchable by date, title, location, genre and by the names of the people involved in whatever capacity. The database was to have an interactive web interface. The second aim was to make the entire structure bi-directional, i.e. to take advantage of the same web interface to permit members of the international scholarly community, after a simple registration procedure, to annotate, comment upon, extend and correct any field in the database. [read more]
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