Lemmatisation

project: Online searchable item level catalogue and sample digital surrogate of the Archigram archives

The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a major new research resources that makes the work of the seminal 1960s-70s British architectural group, Archigram, available free online for public viewing and academic study. The extraordinary influence of Archigram is internationally acknowledged through the award of the RIBA Gold Medal in 2002, exhibitions, books, and through their role in shaping many of the world's greatest contemporary architects and buildings. [read more]

project: A critical edition of the poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym

An AHRC-funded project 2002-7 which produced a digital edition of the work of Dafydd ap Gwilym (a Welsh poet of the 14th century). The work consists of 171 poems, almost all of which survive in manuscripts between 100 and 200 years later than their original composition, and bear signs of textual corruption deriving from oral transmission. Original texts have been restored as far as possible (bearing in mind that the poet's compositions may not have had an entirely fixed form). [read more]

project: Regnum Francorum Online

Regnum Francorum Online: interactive maps and sources of early medieval Europe, is a geospatial database with the aim of referencing historical events of Late Antiquity and Early Medieval (western) Europe to evidence in source-documents, compiling meta-data about the events, such as time, space and agency, and visualizing the events on interactive maps. This far, meta-data about more than 14.000 events are maintained in the database and avilable for further temporal and spatial analysis. [read more]

project: Mechanisms of communication in an ancient empire: The correspondence between the king of Assyria and his magnates in the 8th century BC

The correspondence between Sargon II, king of Assyria (721-705 BC), and his governors and magnates is the largest text corpus of this kind known from antiquity and provides insight into the mechanisms of communication between the top levels of authority in an ancient empire. This website presents these letters together with resources and materials for their study and on their historical and cultural context. The research questions are: How did ancient empires cohere? What roles did long-distance communication play in that coherence? [read more]

project: Concordia

The overall aim of the project was to make it easier for readers to move between publications on the Web, instead of walking from one library shelf to another. Bringing information together in this way helps researchers to recognise a new range of relationships and interactions. [read more]

project: Aphrodisias in Late Antiquity (2004)

This publication is the online second edition of a printed book, which first appeared in 1989, but was out of print: it incorporates new material found since 1989. The resource presents 250 inscribed texts from the 3rd-6th century, found at the ancient site of Aphrodisias in Caria (south-west Turkey): it includes extensive explanatory material and discussions, with detailed indices of people. The existence of the book makes it possible to compare the two ways of presenting the material. [read more]

project: Greek Bible in Byzantine Judaism (GBBJ )

The project's mandate is to gather evidence for the use of Greek Bible translations by Jews in the Middle Ages, to edit and publish these remains, to subject them to linguistic analysis, and to compare them with other Greek biblical texts, earlier, contemporary and later. the corpus developed by the project comprises the exact remains of Jewish Greek Bible versions, edited from manuscripts. [read more]

project: Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth. [read more]

project: Epidoc Aphrodisias Project (EPAPP)

The Epidoc Aphrodisias Project was launched in 2002 to develop and apply tools for presenting ancient Greek and Latin inscriptions on the Internet. With support from the Leverhulme Trust, as part of their Research Interchange Scheme, researchers from Europe, the U.S. and the U.K. [read more]

project: Anglo-Saxon Language of Landscape (LangScape)

The aim of the LangScape Project is to make accessible over the web a rich body of material relating to the English countryside of a thousand years ago and more, using estate boundaries - detailed descriptions by those who lived in and worked the Anglo-Saxon landscape. The completed website - an electronic corpus of Anglo-saxon boundary clauses with extensive XML mark-up - will be a powerful research tool with applications within a broad range of academic disciplines. It will also be designed with a view to its ongoing development for public and schools use. [read more]
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