Sound encoding

project: Online searchable item level catalogue and sample digital surrogate of the Archigram archives

The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a major new research resources that makes the work of the seminal 1960s-70s British architectural group, Archigram, available free online for public viewing and academic study. The extraordinary influence of Archigram is internationally acknowledged through the award of the RIBA Gold Medal in 2002, exhibitions, books, and through their role in shaping many of the world's greatest contemporary architects and buildings. [read more]

project: Capturing the past, preserving the future: digitisation of the national review of live art video collection

The Capturing the Past, Preserving the Future project has the following aims: To preserve for posterity the unique research materials contained in the National Review of Live Art Video Archive by digitising and maintaining the entire collection; To create an interactive and searchable on-line catalogue, including selected copyright-cleared examples of its holdings; To promote the enhanced research facility amongst the UK higher education, national and international performance research and practitioner communities; Readiness for developing curated programmes. [read more]

tool: Pro Tools

Pro Tools is an audio creation and production software. With Pro Tools it is possible to compose, record, edit, and mix music or sound for picture — all within one system.
Features: 
Licence:
Methods relating to this toolCategory
Audio mixingPractice-led research
Music recognitionData capture
Sound analysisData analysis
Sound compressionData structuring and enhancement
Sound editingData structuring and enhancement
Sound editingPractice-led research
Sound encodingData structuring and enhancement
Sound encoding - MIDIData structuring and enhancement
Sound generationData capture
Sound generationPractice-led research
Sound recordingData capture
Sound recordingPractice-led research
Lifecycle stage:
Alternate tool(s):

Cubase, Reaper, Nuendo

project: A critical edition of the poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym

An AHRC-funded project 2002-7 which produced a digital edition of the work of Dafydd ap Gwilym (a Welsh poet of the 14th century). The work consists of 171 poems, almost all of which survive in manuscripts between 100 and 200 years later than their original composition, and bear signs of textual corruption deriving from oral transmission. Original texts have been restored as far as possible (bearing in mind that the poet's compositions may not have had an entirely fixed form). [read more]

project: Musicians of Britain and Ireland 1900-1950

The project provides recordings of performances by British and Irish musicians made between 1900 and 1950. owing to changes in company policy in the 1930s, their work was gradually excluded and mush of it forgotten. MBI is accessible through an attractive online search interface that also gives access to the complete recorded output of the AHRC Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music (CHARM). [read more]

project: The Thomas Gray Archive

The Thomas Gray Archive is a long-term research effort dedicated to studying the life and work of eighteenth-century poet and letter-writer Thomas Gray (1716-1771). The Archive strives to preserve and to make accessible a comprehensive corpus of high-quality, electronic primary sources and secondary materials. [read more]

project: Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music

Aims to promote the study of music as performance through a specific focus on recordings. Its activities include a major discographic project, seminars and research projects. Traditionally, music has been studied as a text reproduced in performance - almost as if it were an obscure kind of literature. By placing performance at the centre of musicology - by promoting a musicology based on recordings and not just scores - CHARM aims to reduce the gulf between musicology and the listener. [read more]

project: Techniques for the analysis of expressive gestures in musical performance

Classical music is traditionally studied from notation; but music sounds, and how it sounds depends on performance style. The project developed techniques to show what constitutes a performance style. Expressive gestures in sound that characterise personal styles of playing and singing were identified and analysed in detail, using computer visualisation techniques for sound analysis. Their deployment and function in different musical contexts were examined. The process of style change over 100 years of recorded music can be seen as resulting from the changing constituents of personal styles. [read more]
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