English Language and Literature

project: Penguin Archive Project

The Penguin Archive Project is a four-year project with an aim to produce an on-line descriptive catalogue of the Penguin Archive, which will be launched on the web in due course and will continue to expand as the project develops. The project will also pioneer research in the archive, particularly in the areas of modern poetry, Penguin 'Specials' and their socio-political impact, and Penguin translations of the classics. [read more]

project: Geographies of Orthodoxy: mapping the English-Pseudo-Bonaventuran Lives of Christ, c. 1350-1550

Geographies of Orthodoxy offers a new account of an English devotional phenomenon and affective literary tradition usually characterised as ‘pseudo-Bonaventuran’ by modern commentators. Geographies of Orthodoxy proposes to examine and make openly accessible through the latest electronic means the entire material remains of the anglophone pseudo-Bonaventuran tradition. [read more]

project: Children's playground games and songs in the new media age

This project will update, analyse and re-present three important collections of children's playground songs and rhymes: the Opie Collection of Children's Games and Songs, and selections from collections at the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition (NATCECT) and the Leeds Archive of Vernacular Culture (LAVC). [read more]

event: Abstract Deadline: Fanpires: Audience consumption of the modern vampire

26/08/2010 19:37
29/10/2010 23:59

CFP: FANPIRES: Audience Consumption of the Modern Vampire
Editors: Gareth Schott & Kirstine Moffat (University of Waikato, New Zealand)
Publisher: New Academia Press (Washington, DC) [read more...]

job: Humanities Research Associate

Application Deadline: 
20/09/2010

The Research Computing unit at UNC-Chapel Hill is seeking a Humanities Research Associate to provide technical leadership to spearhead our engagement with faculty researchers in the humanities. This position will be a technical contributor and a partner in defining, implementing and supporting technologies to advance humanities research at UNC-Chapel Hill. The research associate will provide programming and technical expertise in areas such as text encoding and metadata standards, database design and queries, software development, web programming, and digital project design. [read more...]

project: Who Were the Nuns?

The project is a prosopographical study of the English convents in exile during the period 1600-1800 when it was illegal to be a nun in Britain. Key research questions include a broad response to the question 'Who were the nuns?' This involves locating the members in their family, religious, political and economic context and identifying the support networks sustaining the convents over two centuries. [read more]

project: Women in Modern Irish Culture

The database includes a whole range of publications, such as novels, articles, poems, memoirs, travel writing, essays, cookery writing, plays, films, etc. The database also provides biographical details, where available, such as birth dates, date of death, place of birth and death, places associated with a particular author, together with all known pseudonyms. Every known edition of a book, play, or film is listed, along with details of printers and publishers for each work. [read more]

project: A searchable, standards based catalogue of the Calum Maclean collection of Gaelic oral narrative

The Calum Maclean Collection Online Catalogue Project aims to make a major collection of material central to Scottish Ethnology available in digital form as an accessible and flexible research resource. The collection consists of over 13,000 manuscript pages of transcriptions of Gaelic folklore and song from the fieldwork of Calum Iain Maclean (1915-1960) carried out mainly in the Scottish Hebrides as well as in the Scottish Mainland Highlands. Primarily the collection consists of tale-texts together with full-length autobiographies from two major storytellers. [read more]

project: Staging the Henrician Court

The Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace is the only great hall built by Henry VIII. It is also the only existing Renaissance building in England for which there is unambiguous evidence of its being used for performances throughout the period c.1525 - 1658. In particular, the Great Hall at Hampton Court is largely the same space today as it was when William Shakespeare staged his A Midsummer Night's Dream before James I and VI. Staging the Henrician Court is an interdisciplinary research project into John Heywood's drama, the Play of the Wether. [read more]
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