A catalogue of digital scholarship

The projects section is designed to help you to build and use digital resources. It provides detailed records of several hundred digital arts and humanities projects, including information on the digital resources created and the methods and tools used in the research.

The projects chosen to populate the database mostly derive from AHRC funded projects. Emphasis is given to UK projects, however international projects of wider interest can also be included. If you are involved in a project that should be included please do contact us.

Recently published projects

Project description
Justin's Fake Project
James Mill's common place books A three-year Collaborative Doctoral Award to transcribe and digitally publish James Mill's common place books, currently held in the archive of the London Library. The project is also researching James Mill's intellectual history, particularly the period of his close relationship with Jeremy Bentham (1808-1832). Because Mill was raised and educated in Scotland, there is also a significant Scottish Enlightenment context to the project.
Island of the dead? The buried Neolithic landscape of Herm (Channel Islands) This project seeks to study the relationship between the cluster of megalithic tombs (5th-3rd millennium BC) at the northern end of the small Channel Island of Herm, in the Guernsey archipelago. The tombs came to light during quarrying activity in the 19th century, and several of them were excavated at that period. Those excavations made
Experience and meaning in north Indian classical music The major research project Experience and meaning in music performance investigates how musical performance is experienced by musicians and listeners, and how this experience relates to the meaning people ascribe to it. The core of the project focuses on north Indian raga performance, with other strands concentrating on jazz, rock, Cuban popular music and Afro-Brazilian Congado. This interdisciplinary project is pursued by a team of researchers working in close collaboration, employing a combination of ethnographic and empirical methods.
The Beaker isotope project: mobility, migration and diet in the British Early Bronze Age Were the `Beaker people´ immigrants or indigenous to prehistoric Britain? Nineteenth century antiquarian barrow-diggers observed that the wide-headed (brachycephalic) skulls of Beaker burials were distinguishable from the narrow (dolichocephalic) skulls within Neolithic long barrows, and attributed these to different populations. Since then, theories of a migrant `Beaker folk´ have been contested by alternative theories which interpret the distinctive material culture as part of a Europe-wide `Beaker package´ or cultural pattern adopted by local communities.