A catalogue of digital scholarship

The projects section is designed to help you to build and use digital resources. It provides detailed records of several hundred digital arts and humanities projects, including information on the digital resources created and the methods and tools used in the research.

The projects chosen to populate the database mostly derive from AHRC funded projects. Emphasis is given to UK projects, however international projects of wider interest can also be included. If you are involved in a project that should be included please do contact us.

Recently published projects

Project description
An electronic corpus of 15th century Castilian cancionero manuscripts; towards completion of the Dutton project When Brian Dutton died prematurely in his 60th year (1994), he had completed his magnum opus, the seven-volume El cancionero castellano del siglo XV, in book format (Salamanca: Universidad, 1990-91), but although he had used electronic preparation of texts, he was unable to fulfil the dream of conversion to electronic usage. We can now present the online website version of the Dutton project of courtly verse, alongside our own project of the longer moralistic, didactic and religious Castilian verse of the fifteenth century.
Wyndham Lewis's Art Criticism in the "Listener", 1946-1951: Postwar British Art in its Context of Ideas, Institutions, and Practice. This project is focused on the entire work of Wyndham Lewis, and pays particular attention to the ideological aspects of his thinking. At the same time it is concerned with those aspects of his work which either have not been explored by Spanish or foreign critics, or have been dealt with in equivocal or politically mediated ways. Since a great deal of Lewis's literary production remains dispersed in hard-to-find periodical publications, above all in the USA and Canada, we shall bring these materials together for study and publication.
Turning owners into actors: Possessive morphology as subject-indexing in languages of the Bougainville region A fundamental communicative task for all languages is to show which participant in a sentence is the subject. Languages have various ways of identifying the subject, including word-order, agreement, and case-marking. However, there is another unique and strange method, almost entirely unknown until now, found only in Northwest-Solomonic (NWS), a group of Oceanic languages of the Solomon Islands and Bougainville. In some constructions, these languages indicate subject using word-forms normally indicating possessors of nouns.
The concert programmes database for the UK and Ireland (phase 1) The Concert Programmes Project has created an online database of holdings of concert programmes to be found in selected libraries, archives and museums in the UK and Ireland. Currently, it holds 5,500 collections of music related ephemera held by 53 institutions including the British Library, the Royal College of Music, the Royal Academy of music, the national libraries of Scotland and Ireland and the Bodleian Library and Trinity College Dublin. It includes material from the end of the 17th century to the present day.
ROYAL: Illuminated Manuscripts of the Kings and Queens of England The research project focuses on the Library's collection of medieval and Renaissance Royal illuminated manuscripts. The project, a collaboration with The Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, will culminate in a major exhibition at the British Library in 2011-2012; the research will become part of the British Library's free illustrated online Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (CIM); and will also support and deliver a virtual exhibition and online introductory 'tours' of the Royal collection for visitors to the British Library website.