2d Scanning and photography

project: 'Remembering': Victims, Survivors and Commemoration in Post-conflict Northern Ireland

This section within the CAIN Web site (cain.ulster.ac.uk) contains an extensive on-line digital Archive of source materials and information on the topics of victims, survivors and commemoration in Northern Ireland. Information contained in the Archive helps to document the process by which society in Northern Ireland has so far addressed these complex issues and will be of interest not only to an academic audience but also to policy makers, non-governmental organisations, community leaders and others. [read more]

project: Performance as a medium of learning in museums and at heritage sites - an investigation

The PERFORMANCE, LEARNING AND HERITAGE research project is an investigation into the uses and impact of performance as a medium of learning in museums and at historic sites. The Centre for Applied Theatre Research (CATR) undertook research into the increasing and varied use being made of theatre and other drama-based activity as interpretive tools with visitors to museums and historic sites - an expanding but relatively under-researched field of performance practice. [read more]

project: Reanimating cultural heritage: digital repatriation, knowledge networks and civil society strengthening in post-conflict Sierra Leone

This multidisciplinary project is concerned with innovating 'digital curatorship' in relation to Sierra Leonean collections dispersed in the global museumscape. Extending research in anthropology, museum studies, informatics and beyond, the project considers how objects that have become isolated from the oral and performative contexts that originally animated them can be reanimated in digital space alongside associated images, video clips, sounds, texts and other media, and thereby given new life. [read more]

project: Magnetic moments in the past: Developing archaeomagnetic dating for application in UK archaeology

This project follows on from a previous collaboration which established a methodology for using measurements of the past magnetic field of the Earth for dating archaeological materials in the last 4000 years in the UK. The primary aim of this project is to realise the potential of this research by developing its practical application in UK archaeology. There is increasing interest in using archaeomagnetic dating as part of the suite of chronological tools available to archaeologists. However, it has yet to be adopted routinely. [read more]

project: Who Were the Nuns?

The project is a prosopographical study of the English convents in exile during the period 1600-1800 when it was illegal to be a nun in Britain. Key research questions include a broad response to the question 'Who were the nuns?' This involves locating the members in their family, religious, political and economic context and identifying the support networks sustaining the convents over two centuries. [read more]

project: The Indian Temple: Production, Place and Patronage

Temples dominated the landscape of India between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. Protected by kings and widely supported by endowments and other gifts, temples enjoyed ascendancy as centres of religious life, socio-economic power and artistic production. Although much research has been carried out on temple architecture since the late nineteenth century, important questions remain about how temples were patronised and constructed and the place they occupied in a medieval Indian polity. [read more]

project: An investigation into what constitutes a reproduction in the 20th Century, through the 19th Century collotype process

This project challenged the notion of what constitutes a reproduction in the light of 21st Century digital technology and print output through an evaluation through visual and practical research into 19th Century photomechanical print processes, in particular the process of collotype. Whilst the contemporary half-tonal system is a commercially economical means of printing, the resulting images do not fully attain the same depth of colour or image clarity as those produced by either chemical photography or the screenless photomechanical printing processes in use at the end of the 19th century. [read more]

project: A searchable, standards based catalogue of the Calum Maclean collection of Gaelic oral narrative

The Calum Maclean Collection Online Catalogue Project aims to make a major collection of material central to Scottish Ethnology available in digital form as an accessible and flexible research resource. The collection consists of over 13,000 manuscript pages of transcriptions of Gaelic folklore and song from the fieldwork of Calum Iain Maclean (1915-1960) carried out mainly in the Scottish Hebrides as well as in the Scottish Mainland Highlands. Primarily the collection consists of tale-texts together with full-length autobiographies from two major storytellers. [read more]

project: Designing for services in science and technology-based enterprises

Designing for Services in Science and Technology-Based Enterprises was an interdisciplinary research project initiated by Saïd Business School (SBS) at the University of Oxford. This one-year study (2006-2007) explored how academics, service designers, and science and technology entrepreneurs understand the designing of services in science and technology-based enterprises. Three case studies were set up in which one science-based service enterprise was paired with a design consultancy, working together for six days over several months. [read more]
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