archaeology

project: Magnetic moments in the past: Developing archaeomagnetic dating for application in UK archaeology

This project follows on from a previous collaboration which established a methodology for using measurements of the past magnetic field of the Earth for dating archaeological materials in the last 4000 years in the UK. The primary aim of this project is to realise the potential of this research by developing its practical application in UK archaeology. There is increasing interest in using archaeomagnetic dating as part of the suite of chronological tools available to archaeologists. However, it has yet to be adopted routinely. [read more]

project: The Prehistoric Stones of Greece: a resource from field-survey

The Prehistoric Stones of Greece (SOG) set out to enhance the research value of survey projects conducted in Greece that had recovered Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic materials. SOG’s focus was to establish a database of stone tools and prehistoric lithics generally and by drawing this material into a common format enhance the resource for a variety of archaeological purposes; in particular academic research and heritage management. [read more]

project: Sudamih (Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities)

The Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities (Sudamih) Project aims to address a coherent range of requirements for the more effective management of data (broadly defined) within the Humanities at an institutional level. Whilst the project is fully embedded within the institutional context of Oxford University, the methodologies, outputs and outcomes will be of relevance to other research-led universities, especially but not only, in their support of research within the humanities. [read more]

project: Medieval Warfare on the Grid: The Case of Manzikert

The Medieval Warfare on the Grid project (MWGrid) employs e-science methods and tools to support historical research into logistics of medieval war. The battle of Manzikert (modern Malazgirt, Turkey) in 1071, between the Byzantine Empire and the Seljuk Turks, is the subject of this investigation. This key event, which paved the way for Turkish settlement in eastern Anatolia, has been previously studied through comparative historical analysis. However, due to limited sources and the lack of comprehensive analytical methods, its logistics remain a subject of speculation. [read more]

project: Virtual Kemet: an African-centred Egyptian gallery for prisons

Since 2003 Dr Sally-Ann Ashton, an Egyptologist and Senior Assistant Keeper in the Department of Antiquities at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge has worked with prison education departments as part of an outreach programme. In order to expand her work and to explore the potential for using museum collections as an integral part of prison education, she was granted leave of absence from her post from September 2007 to September 2009. The project focused on Dr Ashton’s fieldwork and research, and the Egyptian and Nubian collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum. [read more]

event: Towards a National Inventory for Libyan Archaeology

11/06/2010 16:30

Digital Classicist and Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2010

Towards a National Inventory for Libyan Archaeology

Hafed Walda (King’s College London) and Charles Lequesne (RPS Group)

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010-02hw.html

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments

Location

Senate House room STB9, Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU
United Kingdom

project: Regnum Francorum Online

Regnum Francorum Online: interactive maps and sources of early medieval Europe, is a geospatial database with the aim of referencing historical events of Late Antiquity and Early Medieval (western) Europe to evidence in source-documents, compiling meta-data about the events, such as time, space and agency, and visualizing the events on interactive maps. This far, meta-data about more than 14.000 events are maintained in the database and avilable for further temporal and spatial analysis. [read more]

project: Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC)

The Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC) makes freely available on the internet the best available materials for a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds. DARMC allows innovative spatial and temporal analyses of all aspects of the civilizations of western Eurasia in the first 1500 years of our era, as well as the generation of original maps illustrating differing aspects of ancient and medieval civilization. [read more]

event: eat, dance, play @ Çatalhöyük in Second Life

04/05/2010 14:00
04/05/2010 17:00

Join us for eat, dance, play @ Çatalhöyük, a project led by Professor Ruth
Tringham of UC Berkeley that explores the intricate life practices of a
Neolithic village in Turkey. Okapi Island, which has been in development
since 2006, offers individuals the unique opportunity to explore
reconstructions of Çatalhöyük, visit our virtual museum, and take guided
video walks through the Island. In this demonstration you will join in [read more...]

project: Technologies of Enchantment: Celtic Art in Southern Britain in the Middle and Late Iron Age

This project aims to investigate the artefacts found in Britain between about 300 BC and 150 AD which have come to be known as ‘Celtic Art’. The project seeks to understand why Celtic Art objects were made in the first place, how they were used and why they often seem to have been intentionally deposited in rivers or under the ground. The first task has been to compile a comprehensive database (in Excel, downloadable from the website) of all Celtic Art ever found in Britain. [read more]
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