Content analysis

project: HESTIA

HESTIA provides a new approach towards conceptions of space in the ancient world, supported by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Combining a variety of different methods, it examines the ways in which space is represented in Herodotus' History, in terms of places mentioned and geographic features described. [read more]

project: Primary Sources on Copyright (1450-1900) (Electronic Database of Historical Materials on Copyright from Five Key Jurisdictions)

Information norms (and in particular the laws of intellectual property) are constitutive of modern societies. An understanding of the sources of these norms is critical to understanding the scope and direction of current laws. The resource relates to key historical documents in the field of copyright, from the invention of the printing press (ca1450) to the blue print of an international author rights regime devised with the Berne Convention of 1886. [read more]

project: Archaeotools: Data mining, facetted classification and E-archaeology

This two year project built upon previous ADS work to develop tools (the Common Information Environment - Archaeobrowser project) using advanced data mining and knowledge capture technologies to allow archaeologists to discover, share and analyse datasets and legacy publications that had hitherto been very difficult to integrate into digital frameworks. The project had three interrelated objectives, each represented by a distinct workpackage. [read more]

project: Early Modern Spain (EMS )

In 2004, the Centre for Computing in the Humanities began a pilot project in collaboration with the Department of Spanish and Spanish-American studies at King’s College London to explore the extent to which some of the traditional scholarly research activities associated with an academic department could be represented using an XML-based architecture. [read more]

project: Greek Bible in Byzantine Judaism (GBBJ )

The project's mandate is to gather evidence for the use of Greek Bible translations by Jews in the Middle Ages, to edit and publish these remains, to subject them to linguistic analysis, and to compare them with other Greek biblical texts, earlier, contemporary and later. the corpus developed by the project comprises the exact remains of Jewish Greek Bible versions, edited from manuscripts. [read more]

project: Person Data Repository of the 19th Century

The project “Construction of a repository for biographical data on historical persons of the 19th century” – short form: Person Data Repository – enhances the existing approaches to data integration and electronically supported research in biographies. It investigates connecting and presenting heterogeneous information on persons of the “long nineteenth century” (1789–1914). The project's aim is to provide a de-central software system for research institutions, universities, archives, and libraries that allows combined access on biographic information from different data pools. [read more]

project: JainPedia

JainPedia will be a free world-leading resource on the web. It offers translations and transcriptions of selected texts and a wealth of contextual information about the Jain religion and its host society in India. The JainPedia team is leading the digitisation of approximately 4,000 pages of the thousands of jain manuscripts and Jain objects in the United Kingdom. The involvement of eminent academics and volunteers from the Jain community in the project highlights how the expertise and enthusiasm of different groups can work together to produce a valuable resource for all. [read more]

project: The Thomas Gray Archive

The Thomas Gray Archive is a long-term research effort dedicated to studying the life and work of eighteenth-century poet and letter-writer Thomas Gray (1716-1771). The Archive strives to preserve and to make accessible a comprehensive corpus of high-quality, electronic primary sources and secondary materials. [read more]

project: Jane Austen's holograph fiction manuscripts: a digital and print resource

Jane Austen's fiction manuscripts are the first significant body of holograph evidence for any British novelist. They represent every stage of her writing career and a variety of physical states: working drafts, fair copies, and handwritten publications for private circulation. The manuscripts were held in a single collection until 1845, when at her sister Cassandra's death they were dispersed. [read more]

project: Nineteenth Century Serials Edition

A three year Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded project, ncse seeks to achieve two key objectives: First the ncse project responds to the pressing need to republish these fragile printed items in ways which maintain their integrity. As physical collections are often incomplete, and deteriorating quality hampers access, electronic editions offer new opportunities to re-present such material in a way that is, for the first time online, comprehensive and freely available meaning that the material can be used in entirely novel ways. [read more]
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