Indexing

project: Unlocking the Celtic Collector; The Mind, Methods and Materials of Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912).

The Carmichael Watson collection in Edinburgh University Library, centred on the papers of the pioneering folklorist Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912), is the foremost collection of its kind in the country, and is crucial to understanding the customs, storytelling traditions, poetry, songs and general lore of the Gaelic-speaking areas of Scotland. The project will see an intense dissemination and research programme alongside development of a digital resource that will enable users to search fully-indexed catalogue descriptions, full text transcriptions and biographical records. [read more]

project: William Godwin's Diary

The project provides a digital edition of the diary of William Godwin (1756-1836). Godwin’s diary consists of 32 octavo notebooks. The first entry is for 6 April 1788 and the final entry is for 26 March 1836, shortly before he died. The diary is a resource of immense importance to researchers of history, politics, literature, and women’s studies. [read more]

project: London Theatre Bibliography (LTB)

This project combines two independent, but mutually supportive, projects which have complementary outputs: the need for a systematic and complete edition of all pre-1642 manuscript and printed records relating to the eight early Middlesex/Westminster theatres north of the Thames, and the complementary need for an aggregated bibliography which locates, assesses, and digests all printed transcriptions of pre-1642 documents relating to these theatres. [read more]

project: An electronic corpus of 15th century Castilian cancionero manuscripts; towards completion of the Dutton project

When Brian Dutton died prematurely in his 60th year (1994), he had completed his magnum opus, the seven-volume El cancionero castellano del siglo XV, in book format (Salamanca: Universidad, 1990-91), but although he had used electronic preparation of texts, he was unable to fulfil the dream of conversion to electronic usage. We can now present the online website version of the Dutton project of courtly verse, alongside our own project of the longer moralistic, didactic and religious Castilian verse of the fifteenth century. [read more]

project: Online searchable item level catalogue and sample digital surrogate of the Archigram archives

The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a major new research resources that makes the work of the seminal 1960s-70s British architectural group, Archigram, available free online for public viewing and academic study. The extraordinary influence of Archigram is internationally acknowledged through the award of the RIBA Gold Medal in 2002, exhibitions, books, and through their role in shaping many of the world's greatest contemporary architects and buildings. [read more]

project: Geographies of Orthodoxy: mapping the English-Pseudo-Bonaventuran Lives of Christ, c. 1350-1550

Geographies of Orthodoxy offers a new account of an English devotional phenomenon and affective literary tradition usually characterised as ‘pseudo-Bonaventuran’ by modern commentators. Geographies of Orthodoxy proposes to examine and make openly accessible through the latest electronic means the entire material remains of the anglophone pseudo-Bonaventuran tradition. [read more]

project: Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS)

The aim of the project is to use new technology to present and analyse the tradition of wisdom literatures in Greek and Arabic. Throughout antiquity and the middle ages collections of wise or useful sayings were created and circulated, as a practical response to the cost and inaccessibility of full texts in a manuscript age; the project will focus on those which collected moral and social advice. The compilation of these collections formed a crucial route by which ideas of reasonable behaviour and good conduct were disseminated over a huge area, and over many centuries. [read more]

project: 'Remembering': Victims, Survivors and Commemoration in Post-conflict Northern Ireland

This section within the CAIN Web site (cain.ulster.ac.uk) contains an extensive on-line digital Archive of source materials and information on the topics of victims, survivors and commemoration in Northern Ireland. Information contained in the Archive helps to document the process by which society in Northern Ireland has so far addressed these complex issues and will be of interest not only to an academic audience but also to policy makers, non-governmental organisations, community leaders and others. [read more]

project: Who Were the Nuns?

The project is a prosopographical study of the English convents in exile during the period 1600-1800 when it was illegal to be a nun in Britain. Key research questions include a broad response to the question 'Who were the nuns?' This involves locating the members in their family, religious, political and economic context and identifying the support networks sustaining the convents over two centuries. [read more]
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