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project: Online searchable item level catalogue and sample digital surrogate of the Archigram archives

The Archigram Archival Project (AAP) is a major new research resources that makes the work of the seminal 1960s-70s British architectural group, Archigram, available free online for public viewing and academic study. The extraordinary influence of Archigram is internationally acknowledged through the award of the RIBA Gold Medal in 2002, exhibitions, books, and through their role in shaping many of the world's greatest contemporary architects and buildings. [read more]

project: Monastic Archives: enhancement of typology and database

The overriding aim of this project is to equip users of the existing web-based English Monastic Archives database with the expertise required to make the best use of the data that it structures. These records are of a volume and range that are unmatched in Britain save by the records of the Crown. In a previous project, an estimated 88% of the records were located and described, and the catalogue descriptions were made available on the internet. The present proposal seeks to build on that in three ways. 1. [read more]

project: Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951

Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951 is the first comprehensive study of sculptors, related businesses and trades investigated in the context of creative collaborations, art infrastructures, professional networks and cultural geographies. The primary outcome of Mapping Sculpture 1851-1951 will be an open access online database on the GU website with postings of articles analyzing the results of the research. The database launch will coincide with exhibitions in the V&A's Gilbert Bayes Gallery and a collections display at the Henry Moore Institute. [read more]

project: Glastonbury Abbey: Archaeological Archive Project

This project will analyse and publish the archive of excavations at Glastonbury Abbey by iconic figures in the history of archaeology: St John Hope (1904), Bligh Bond (1908-21), Peers and Clapham (1928-39) and Ralegh Radford (1951-64). The results of the project will be published as a monograph and will be accessible as an online database through the Archaeology Data Service. [read more]

project: Buried treasure: rediscovering the Lord Chamberlain's collection of plays

The project began upon the long-overdue cataloguing of the Lord Chamberlain's collection from 1852 onwards. The pilot covered the decade to 1863. The collection for that period numbers about 3000 plays, including for example the British versions of Uncle Tom's Cabin and many farces and pantomimes with political implications around issues such as first-wave feminism. Cultured mid-Victorians agreed with G. H. Lewes that 'drama is extinct as literature' and ignored the new performance culture; these plays have therefore never been considered in either literary or social histories. [read more]

project: Beyond Legalism: Amnesties, Transition and Conflict Transformation

Amnesty laws are an important but often contentious way for states to quell dissent, end conflict or shield state agents from prosecution. This project aims to move beyond legalistic debates to produce an analysis of the consequences of enacting amnesty laws during transitional periods, based on fieldwork in five jurisdictions worldwide. The website contains the Amnesty Law Database comprising materials relating to over 500 amnesty laws enacted since the end of World War Two. [read more]

project: Fitna, the video battle: how YouTube enables the young to perform their religious and public identities

In March 2008, Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders released a 16 minute anti-Islam movie called Fitna. Wilders had a hard time finding a broadcaster or internet provider willing to air the film, because his mere idea caused an immense global controversy, leading to death threats, violent protest, diplomatic incidents and fierce public debate. One of the reactions consisted of organised and unorganised video protest by young people from all over the world, who uploaded their reactions to websites such as YouTube or LiveLeak. [read more]

project: Contested Common Land: environmental governance, law and sustainable land management c.1600-2006

An examination of the management of common land since the 17th century using historical methods of enquiry, and an examination of modern governance mechanisms and the emergence of sustainable land management as a discrete objective for the future of our Commons. [read more]

project: Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS)

The aim of the project is to use new technology to present and analyse the tradition of wisdom literatures in Greek and Arabic. Throughout antiquity and the middle ages collections of wise or useful sayings were created and circulated, as a practical response to the cost and inaccessibility of full texts in a manuscript age; the project will focus on those which collected moral and social advice. The compilation of these collections formed a crucial route by which ideas of reasonable behaviour and good conduct were disseminated over a huge area, and over many centuries. [read more]

project: Connecting Cornwall: Telecommunications, Locality and Work in West Britain 1870-1918

Cornwall has a number of significant historical communications sites starting with Porthcurno and ranging over early radio sites at Poldhu and the Lizard to Land’s End and Bodmin Radio and the Satellite station at Goonhilly. The ‘Connecting Cornwall’ project will be using the Cable and Wireless historic archive to develop new research into the communications industry in Cornwall with an emphasis on the Eastern Telegraph Company in the first instance. [read more]
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