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project: Children's playground games and songs in the new media age

This project will update, analyse and re-present three important collections of children's playground songs and rhymes: the Opie Collection of Children's Games and Songs, and selections from collections at the National Centre for English Cultural Tradition (NATCECT) and the Leeds Archive of Vernacular Culture (LAVC). [read more]

project: CESAR IMAGES: a searchable online repository of French theatre images 1600-1800

The primary aim was to produce a single, coherent listing of all known theatre and related performances in France between 1600 and 1800, searchable by date, title, location, genre and by the names of the people involved in whatever capacity. The database was to have an interactive web interface. The second aim was to make the entire structure bi-directional, i.e. to take advantage of the same web interface to permit members of the international scholarly community, after a simple registration procedure, to annotate, comment upon, extend and correct any field in the database. [read more]

project: 'Remembering': Victims, Survivors and Commemoration in Post-conflict Northern Ireland

This section within the CAIN Web site (cain.ulster.ac.uk) contains an extensive on-line digital Archive of source materials and information on the topics of victims, survivors and commemoration in Northern Ireland. Information contained in the Archive helps to document the process by which society in Northern Ireland has so far addressed these complex issues and will be of interest not only to an academic audience but also to policy makers, non-governmental organisations, community leaders and others. [read more]

project: "Admission All Classes": Entertainment for the Masses 1850 - 1950

This project was a Knowledge Transfer Award, held between the University of Sheffield and Blackpool Council. "Admission All Classes" aimed to disseminate the history of fairground, music hall, circus and sea-side entertainments at the UK's premier entertainment resort and thereby revitalise its entertainment and cultural industry quarter. The project hosted ten themed events over a series of themed weekends between July 2007 and October 2008 including film, dance and acrobatics, theatre, and circus. [read more]

project: Who Were the Nuns?

The project is a prosopographical study of the English convents in exile during the period 1600-1800 when it was illegal to be a nun in Britain. Key research questions include a broad response to the question 'Who were the nuns?' This involves locating the members in their family, religious, political and economic context and identifying the support networks sustaining the convents over two centuries. [read more]

project: Staging Exile, Migration and Diaspora in Hispanic Theatre and Performance Cultures

The project focuses on Spanish Republican Exile (SRE) theatre and performance, aiming to recover, represent and help to preserve the full range of representation of the experience of exile in theatrical and performance texts and paratexts (histories, memoirs, reviews, criticism, photographs and audiovisual recordings), by contributing to the creation, updating and maintenance of the Centre for the Study of Hispanic Exile's bibliographical database and stand-alone web resource on SRE, and by bringing together key researchers on Spanish Exile Theatre and Performance in a series of panels within [read more]

project: Religious nurture in Muslim families

Qualitative sociological research about how children aged 12 and under are brought up to be Muslims. The School of Social Sciences and the Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK conducted a joint research project. The first stage was secondary analysis of the 2003 Home Office Citizenship Survey to compare rates of religious transmission in different groups. The research team then conducted original qualitative research with 60 Muslim families in Cardiff. This involved semi-structured interviews, children keeping audio and photographic diaries and some observation of formal learning. [read more]

project: Making Britain: South Asian Visions of Home and Abroad (1870-1950)

The Making Britain Database launched in September 2010. It houses an annotated bibliography of selected materials relating to South Asian artists, writers, activists and organizations in Britain during the period 1870 to 1950. Britain has had a migrant South Asian population for over 350 years, since its early trading encounters with India. But the perception that a homogeneous British culture only began to diversify after the Second World War persists, and research into the South Asian diaspora in Britain has focused predominantly on this later, post-independence period. [read more]

project: In an arena including digital and traditional artists' publishing formats - what will be the canon for the artist's book in the 21st Century?

This project investigated and discussed issues concerning the history and future of the artist’s book. Our aim was to extend and sustain critical debate of what constitutes an artist’s book in the 21st Century - in order to propose an inclusive structure for the academic study, artistic practice and historical appreciation of the artist’s book. All of the research outcomes, including the publication A Manifesto for the Book, audio and video files,interviews and case studies are downloadable from the project website. http://www.bookarts.uwe.ac.uk/canon.htm [read more]

project: Why me? Artist's use of self image

The project created an alphabetically presented research database containing the names of over 340 artists worldwide who feature their own physical presence within the artworks they present. It is anticipated that this database will be of interest to artists, academics within the research community, the art media and art viewing public; specifically those interested in investigating and questioning cross cultural parallels between artist's use of self representation through diverse artistic practices. [read more]
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