Music recognition

eventresources: The Future of Information Technology in Music Research and Practice

Report on the Methods Network workshop run by Dave Meredith, Goldsmiths College, University of London, 8 September 2006.

The goals of this workshop were:

  • To identify worthwhile goals for future inter-disciplinary projects involving collaboration between technologists and music researchers and practitioners.
  • To raise awareness among leading music researchers and practitioners of the ways in which technology can (and cannot) be used to improve musical research and practice.

eventresources: Virtual Audio and Past Environments: Audio and Acoustics in Heritage Applications

Report on the Methods Network workshop organized by Damian Murphy, University of York (17 March 2008).

A one-day workshop to explore multi-disciplinary approaches to audio, acoustics, and sound design, and to discover how current techniques and research might be applied specifically to heritage and related applications. [read more...]

event: The Future of ICT in Music Research and Practice

00/00/

Organized and run by David Meredith, Goldsmiths College, University of London.

The goals of this workshop were:

* To identify worthwhile goals for future inter-disciplinary projects involving collaboration between technologists and music researchers and practitioners. [read more...]

briefingpaper: Digital Tools for Musicology

This paper introduces, and reflects on, a selection of recent and current technical approaches to musicology with a view to promoting and encouraging the use of ICT techniques for research within the discipline. [read more...]

project: Electronic corpus of Lute music (ECOLM) II

ECOLM is a web-accessible user-friendly digital scholarly resource centred around the musicology of the lute. By means of a guided interface, it supplies professional and amateur users with effective and efficient search methods (using words or music as queries) over a database comprising over 2000 pieces of lute music, which can be retrieved, viewed in tablature and (given a suitable computer) played back, without the need to understand specialist computer code. [read more]
Syndicate content