Record linkages

project: The Old Bailey Online, 1674-1834

The Old Bailey Proceedings form one of the largest bodies of published text ever created, detailing the lives and experiences of non-elite people. Containing 25 million words of text, they record the evidence given at and outcome of 100,000 trials held at the Old Bailey. This project has created a searchable text-base, that can be used for free text searching, structured searching of marked-up text, and statistical analysis. [read more]

project: Reassessing ancient Egyptian crops, crop husbandry and the agrarian landscape

The main focus of the project is to provide a well-integrated reassessment of the diversity, distribution and use of Egyptian crops, crop husbandry and the agrarian landscape through the systematic compilation and analysis of Egyptian archaeobotanical data which will also be integrated with the textual, artistic and ethnohistorical evidence for crops and other species in order to create a more powerful methodology for understanding the complex processes of ancient Egyptian agriculture than the use of any single source of evidence alone. [read more]

project: The Anglo-Norman On-line Hub

Phase 1 of the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub project (2002-2004), funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board under its Resource Enhancement Scheme, had the following aims and objectives: to open up for on-line access significant resources that will advance research into the languages and society of medieval Britain and support university courses across a wide areas of medieval studies; to develop, evaluate, deploy and propagate XML-based technologies that will be of service in many areas of Humanities computing worlwide. [read more]

project: A Descriptive Catalogue of the James M. Carpenter Collection of Traditional Song and Drama

The James Madison Carpenter Collection of Traditional Song and Drama is one of the most important and extensive collections of its kind. The bulk of it comprises British material which Carpenter (1888-1983), a Harvard graduate, gathered in the period 1928-35. The remainder comprises material gathered from various parts of the USA and probably dates from immediately after this period. [read more]

project: Developing Archival Context Standards for Functions in the Higher Education Sector

The project is carrying out research into the potential impact of a functional approach to archival description. It is verifying new ways of accessing archival information by identifying and describing the functions and activities of Scottish Higher Education Institutions from the fifteenth century to the present day, flagging up relevant archival records held in Scottish Universities and Colleges. [read more]

project: Tibetan visual history 1920-1950: an online resource

The Pitt Rivers Museum and the British Museum together hold extraordinarily rich, and overlapping, collections of over 6,000 historical photographs of Tibet taken between 1920 and 1950. Conceived by their photographers as a unified visual resource, the photographs chart a crucial period in Tibetan history and in Anglo-Tibetan relations. More importantly the photographs constitute a vital record of Tibetan culture destroyed since the Chinese occupation. [read more]

project: British Fiction, 1800-1829: A Database of Production, Circulation and Reception History

British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation & Reception (DBF) arises from more than fifteen years’ general research into Romantic-era British fiction, by the project director, Professor Peter Garside. The project provides a comprehensive bibliographical record of the production of fiction during the first three decades of the nineteenth century, supplemented by a variety of contextual secondary materials drawn from the period. [read more]

project: People in Place: families, households and housing in early modern London

This project examines the crucial role of family and household in the social and economic transformations that took place in London in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Population growth, immigration, urbanisation, and commercialisation produced new patterns of sociability, gender relations, employment, and domestic lifestyle. The family was central to all these developments, but has been little studied in detail. [read more]

project: Law and Empire, AD 193-455: the Projet Volterra (2)

The general aims of the Projet Volterra (named, in association with the École Française de Rome, in honour of Edoardo Volterra (1904-1987), the distinguished scholar of Roman Law) are to promote the study of Roman legislation in its full social, political and legal context, and its continuing tradition. The area of Roman imperial legal pronouncements was identified as one in which current scholarship was less than adequately served in terms of Regesten, repertoria and bibliographical aids. [read more]
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