scotland

project: A searchable, standards based catalogue of the Calum Maclean collection of Gaelic oral narrative

The Calum Maclean Collection Online Catalogue Project aims to make a major collection of material central to Scottish Ethnology available in digital form as an accessible and flexible research resource. The collection consists of over 13,000 manuscript pages of transcriptions of Gaelic folklore and song from the fieldwork of Calum Iain Maclean (1915-1960) carried out mainly in the Scottish Hebrides as well as in the Scottish Mainland Highlands. Primarily the collection consists of tale-texts together with full-length autobiographies from two major storytellers. [read more]

project: A Supplement to the Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

This electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language (eDIL) is a digital edition of the complete contents of the Royal Irish Academy’s Dictionary of the Irish Language based mainly on Old and Middle Irish materials. The eDIL team is now beginning the task of revising the content of the Dictionary itself. In order to permit meaningful searches of the Dictionary, the digital text has been marked up in Extensible Mark-up Language (XML) following the guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) for Print Dictionaries. [read more]

project: Technologies of Enchantment: Celtic Art in Southern Britain in the Middle and Late Iron Age

This project aims to investigate the artefacts found in Britain between about 300 BC and 150 AD which have come to be known as ‘Celtic Art’. The project seeks to understand why Celtic Art objects were made in the first place, how they were used and why they often seem to have been intentionally deposited in rivers or under the ground. The first task has been to compile a comprehensive database (in Excel, downloadable from the website) of all Celtic Art ever found in Britain. [read more]

Digital Design Studio wins AHRC research grant for enhancing engagement with virtual heritage

The 1938 British Empire Exhibition was a stunning display of architectural achievement and a reflection of the life and culture of Glasgow, the UK and the Commonwealth. It incorporated over 100 innovative buildings, including the world famous Tait’s Tower and attracted over 12.5million people to Bellahouston Park, Glasgow over its six month run. This last public showcase of the Empire was of huge international significance and continues to be relevant to the study of British social and industrial history and modernist architecture. [read more...]

project: Intangible Cultural Heritage in Scotland

This project is concerned with the conserving and recording of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) in Scotland. ICH means the practices, representations, expressions, knowledges and skills and associated objects and spaces associated with them - that communities, groups and in some cases individuals recognise as part of their cultural heritage. In recent years, ICH has received international recognition and its safeguarding has become one of the priorities of international cooperation. [read more]

project: The origin and spread of stock-keeping in the Near East and Europe

In western Eurasia we know that the earliest evidence for domestic farmyard animals occurs around 10,000 years ago. We also know that farming then spread westwards through Europe over the subsequent millennia, arriving in the far west and north of Europe some 6,000 years ago. For decades there have been major debates as to the nature of this spread, with many basic questions still remaining largely unanswered. The objective of this major research project, which has been funded for four years by the AHRC, is to address these questions. [read more]

project: Dictionary of Scottish Architects

The Dictionary of Scottish Architects is a database with biographies and full job lists for all those who practised in Scotland after 1840. This includes not only men and women who were born in Scotland but also those from elsewhere who designed buildings and entered competitions here. It is available over the internet without restriction. During the first 3-year period which was funded by the AHRC the Dictionary covered the period up to 1940; at the start of 2008, the inclusion of post-1940 architects was begun. It is anticipated that this new project will be completed in 2011. [read more]

project: The Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing (1700-1945)

The Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing (1700-1945) project will provide an evidence-based platform for a new account of the development of Modern Scots and Scottish English. It will create a major research resource, namely a publicly available, digitised archive of texts in language varieties ranging from Broad Scots to Scottish Standard English. This corpus will provide the 'missing link' between the Helsinki Corpus of Older Scots and its related projects (1375-1700) and the Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech (1945-present day; www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk ). [read more]

project: Imagining history: medieval texts, contexts and communities in 'the English Brut Tradition'

"The 'Imagining History' project is the first large-scale collaborative investigation of the manuscripts of the Middle English Prose Brut chronicle, arguably the most prolificly disseminated secular text of the English Middle Ages. [read more]

project: Digitisation of the dictionary of the Irish language

This project (2003-07) set out to digitise and publish the complete contents of the Royal Irish Academy’s Dictionary of the Irish Language (DIL). The Dictionary has been an invaluable tool to scholars and students since its publication in twenty-three separate fasciculi between 1913 and 1976 but the difficulties in using the paper edition are widely recognised. The digitised version ameliorates many of these problems and for the first time enables users to make searches of discrete data types such as translations, citations, grammatical descriptions and sources. [read more]
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