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project: Capturing the past, preserving the future: digitisation of the national review of live art video collection

The Capturing the Past, Preserving the Future project has the following aims: To preserve for posterity the unique research materials contained in the National Review of Live Art Video Archive by digitising and maintaining the entire collection; To create an interactive and searchable on-line catalogue, including selected copyright-cleared examples of its holdings; To promote the enhanced research facility amongst the UK higher education, national and international performance research and practitioner communities; Readiness for developing curated programmes. [read more]

project: The Prehistoric Stones of Greece: a resource from field-survey

The Prehistoric Stones of Greece (SOG) set out to enhance the research value of survey projects conducted in Greece that had recovered Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic materials. SOG’s focus was to establish a database of stone tools and prehistoric lithics generally and by drawing this material into a common format enhance the resource for a variety of archaeological purposes; in particular academic research and heritage management. [read more]

project: Records of Early English Drama, Middlesex/Westminster: Eight Theatres north of the Thames

This project focuses on two fundamental research problems: the need for a systematic and complete edition of all pre-1642 manuscript and printed records relating to the eight early Middlesex/Westminster theatres north of the Thames (1642 being the date of the closure of the London theatres by the authorities); the complementary need for a widely-available aggregated bibliography which locates, assesses, and digests all later printed transcriptions of pre-1642 documents relating to these theatres. [read more]

project: Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia

The Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia is a co-operative research project between the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit at the University of Cambridge, and the International Association for Mongol Studies in Ulaanbaatar. The project has two goals: to increase knowledge of how people’s contexts affect understandings of events and history and to construct an on-line database in Mongolian and English of the oral history of Mongolia. We seek to increase our understanding of the relationship between memory, history and people’s political, cultural, social and economic contexts. [read more]

project: Medieval Warfare on the Grid: The Case of Manzikert

The Medieval Warfare on the Grid project (MWGrid) employs e-science methods and tools to support historical research into logistics of medieval war. The battle of Manzikert (modern Malazgirt, Turkey) in 1071, between the Byzantine Empire and the Seljuk Turks, is the subject of this investigation. This key event, which paved the way for Turkish settlement in eastern Anatolia, has been previously studied through comparative historical analysis. However, due to limited sources and the lack of comprehensive analytical methods, its logistics remain a subject of speculation. [read more]

project: Glasgow Emblem Digitisation Project

The site has been developed, with generous funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council under the Resource Enhancement Scheme, by a team led by Post-Doctoral Research Assistant Jonathan Spangler, and Project Director Alison Adams. All but two of the emblem books digitised are from the Stirling Maxwell Collection in Glasgow University Library. The Bodleian Library and the Bibliothèque Mazarine have generously made material available to enable us to present the complete corpus. The Project is undertaken within the OpenEmblem initiative. [read more]

project: A critical edition of the poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym

An AHRC-funded project 2002-7 which produced a digital edition of the work of Dafydd ap Gwilym (a Welsh poet of the 14th century). The work consists of 171 poems, almost all of which survive in manuscripts between 100 and 200 years later than their original composition, and bear signs of textual corruption deriving from oral transmission. Original texts have been restored as far as possible (bearing in mind that the poet's compositions may not have had an entirely fixed form). [read more]

project: The Letters of Bess of Hardwick

Elizabeth, countess of Shrewsbury (c.1522-1608), known as ‘Bess of Hardwick’, is one of Elizabethan England most famous figures. She is renowned for her reputation as an indomitable matriarch and dynast and perhaps best known as the builder of great stately homes like the magnificent Hardwick Hall and Chatsworth House. The story of her life as told to date takes little account of her more than 230 letters. The aim of the project is to make these letters accessible by producing a searchable, interactive online edition of all ca. [read more]

project: Dissenting academy libraries and their readers, 1720-1860

The specific aim of this new project is to analyse and compare the libraries of the principal Congregational, Presbyterian, and Baptist academies, and in particular the use of the books by the students. The main repositories of catalogues, loan registers, surviving books, student essays, and lecture notes are Dr Williams's Library, London, Harris Manchester College, Oxford, and Bristol Baptist College. [read more]

project: Short term morphosyntactic change: Variation in Russian 1801-2000

Russian is a language with a rich and relatively stable system of inflectional morphology. Yet while the system of forms has changed relatively little, the use of these forms has undergone a remarkable degree of change over a short time period. Changes include distribution of cases, of gender and number values, and of the competing inflectional forms of adjectives. These changes are dramatic when taken individually; however they do not form an obvious single picture, and there is no tendency to eliminate these morphosyntactic choices. [read more]
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