sound

job: Fellowships at Cornell Society for the Humanities

Application Deadline: 
01/10/2010

CORNELL SOCIETY FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOWSHIPS 2011-2012
SOUND: CULTURE, THEORY, PRACTICE, POLITICS

Timothy Murray, Director of the Society for the Humanities, is pleased to announce the 2011-2012 research focal theme: "Sound: Culture, Theory, Practice, Politics." Six to eight Fellows will be appointed.

CALL FOR FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS [read more...]

project: Commissioning, production, content and audience reception of bicentenary events commemorating the abolition of the slave trade in the UK, 1807-2007

The central aim of the 1807 Commemorated project was to both map and analyse the responses of museums and their audiences to the 2007 bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade act of 1807. [read more]

project: Capturing the past, preserving the future: digitisation of the national review of live art video collection

The Capturing the Past, Preserving the Future project has the following aims: To preserve for posterity the unique research materials contained in the National Review of Live Art Video Archive by digitising and maintaining the entire collection; To create an interactive and searchable on-line catalogue, including selected copyright-cleared examples of its holdings; To promote the enhanced research facility amongst the UK higher education, national and international performance research and practitioner communities; Readiness for developing curated programmes. [read more]

project: Angloromani: A structural and functional description

English Romanes - also called 'Angloromani' by researchers - is the language or speech form of the English and Welsh Romani Gypsies. Earlier generations of British Gypsies spoke a dialect of Romani that was closely related to the Romani dialects of continental Europe. Knowledge and use of Romani declined among Gypsies in Britain during the nineteenth century, and today what remains of the language is mainly a vocabulary of words of Romani origin. English Gypsies often use these Romani words within their English conversation. [read more]

project: Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia

The Oral History of Twentieth Century Mongolia is a co-operative research project between the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit at the University of Cambridge, and the International Association for Mongol Studies in Ulaanbaatar. The project has two goals: to increase knowledge of how people’s contexts affect understandings of events and history and to construct an on-line database in Mongolian and English of the oral history of Mongolia. We seek to increase our understanding of the relationship between memory, history and people’s political, cultural, social and economic contexts. [read more]

project: Hidden Histories of Exploration: Exhibiting Geographical Collections

This project considers the role played by indigenous peoples and intermediaries in the history of exploration, as revealed by research in the collections of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). The project is particularly concerned with the roles of guides, porters, pilots, cooks, carriers, interpreters, go-betweens and informants in the creation of geographical knowledge. In wider terms, it seeks to provide a model for new ways of working with well-established geographical collections. [read more]

project: What is Black British Jazz? Routes, Ownership, Performance

The ‘Black British jazz’ project (BBJ) explores the emergence of a distinct tradition within British music. BBJ melds reggae, hiphop, African music and US jazz into a rich, and constantly developing set of sounds. In documenting this musical hybrid, the project touches on important issues for the study of music – the transmission of cultural values, the social context of musical forms, and frameworks of ownership that impact on musical communities. [read more]

project: "It was forty years ago today...": Locating the Early History of Performance Art in Wales 1965-1979

The project examines how performance art histories are constructed, paying particular attention to the development of the art form in the context of Wales. [read more]

project: Digital Himalaya Project

The Digital Himalaya project was designed by Professor Alan Macfarlane and Dr Mark Turin as a strategy for archiving and making available valuable ethnographic materials from the Himalayan region. The Digital Himalaya project had three primary objectives: 1. to preserve in a digital medium archival anthropological materials from the Himalayan region that were quickly degenerating in their current forms, including films in various formats, still photographs, sound recordings, field notes, maps and rare journals 2. [read more]

project: From subjects to citizens: society and the everyday state in North India and Pakistan, 1947-1964

This research project is a three-year collaboration between the universities of Leeds and Royal Holloway which is studying the interaction between state and citizen immediately before and in the two decades following India and Pakistan’s independence in 1947. The website contains downloadable podcasts of interviews, a bibliography, links to archives and a mailing list. To date, research has concentrated on the politics high levels of government, and little work has been done on the impact of independence and partition on everyday life. [read more]
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