Sound analysis

project: Transnational Communities: towards a sense of belonging

Using both participatory action research and arts practice the project explored a sense of belonging, place and emplacement with four transnational communities who are defined as refugees/asylum seekers/undocumented people (in Derby, Leicester, Loughborough and Nottingham). The Long Journey Home artists in exile group based in Nottingham explored these themes and created a series of works for exhibition. Other regional universities supported us with; exhibition space, staff support, supporting artists and communities. [read more]

project: Turning owners into actors: Possessive morphology as subject-indexing in languages of the Bougainville region

A fundamental communicative task for all languages is to show which participant in a sentence is the subject. Languages have various ways of identifying the subject, including word-order, agreement, and case-marking. However, there is another unique and strange method, almost entirely unknown until now, found only in Northwest-Solomonic (NWS), a group of Oceanic languages of the Solomon Islands and Bougainville. In some constructions, these languages indicate subject using word-forms normally indicating possessors of nouns. [read more]

project: Documentation of endangered languages and cultures in the Nigeria-Cameroon borderland

The Nigeria-Cameroon borderland is one of the most linguistically diverse regions of the world, with many languages either near extinction or severely endangered. This project builds on previous work by the participants in surveying and documenting endangered languages in this region. One example is the language of the Somyewe, a small group of blacksmiths whose language and culture are on the verge of disappearing. Documentation of two other local languages will also be undertaken. [read more]

project: What is Black British Jazz? Routes, Ownership, Performance

The ‘Black British jazz’ project (BBJ) explores the emergence of a distinct tradition within British music. BBJ melds reggae, hiphop, African music and US jazz into a rich, and constantly developing set of sounds. In documenting this musical hybrid, the project touches on important issues for the study of music – the transmission of cultural values, the social context of musical forms, and frameworks of ownership that impact on musical communities. [read more]

project: Archival Sound Recordings

Archival Sound Recordings is the result of a development project to increase access to the British Library Sound Archive's extensive collections. The British Library holds one of the world’s foremost sound archives with a collection of over 3.5 million audio recordings. These come from all over the world and cover the entire range of recorded sound from music, drama and literature, to oral history, wildlife and environmental sounds. [read more]

project: Newsfilm Online

NewsFilm Online delivered up to 60,000 segmented encodings, totalling some 3,000 hours from the archives of ITN and Reuters Television – including some of the most significant events of the past century such as the Crystal Palace fire (1936) to the first interview with Nelson Mandela (1961), from the battle of Newport Bridge (1975) to the death of Diana, Princess of Wales (1997) are all included. Newsfilm Online allows users to download and manipulate news broadcasts on a wide range of themes, reflecting epochal events through contemporaneous media reports. [read more]

project: Musicians of Britain and Ireland 1900-1950

The project provides recordings of performances by British and Irish musicians made between 1900 and 1950. owing to changes in company policy in the 1930s, their work was gradually excluded and mush of it forgotten. MBI is accessible through an attractive online search interface that also gives access to the complete recorded output of the AHRC Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music (CHARM). [read more]

project: Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music

Aims to promote the study of music as performance through a specific focus on recordings. Its activities include a major discographic project, seminars and research projects. Traditionally, music has been studied as a text reproduced in performance - almost as if it were an obscure kind of literature. By placing performance at the centre of musicology - by promoting a musicology based on recordings and not just scores - CHARM aims to reduce the gulf between musicology and the listener. [read more]

eventresources: Modern Methods for Musicology

A Methods Network expert seminar hosted by Tim Crawford, Department of Computing, Goldsmiths College, University of London.

This seminar explored the ways in which information and communication technology can be used to enhance research, teaching and learning in musicology, including fields such as music theory, analysis and performance analysis and traditional historical musicology. Presentations and discussions provided a picture of the realities of how ICT is currently being used in musicology as well as prospects and proposals for how it could be fruitfully used in the future.

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