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project: A scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, published on the internet

This project has created a full scholarly digital edition of Codex Sinaiticus, one of the two oldest Greek Bibles and the oldest complete New Testament, arguably the most important of all surviving ancient manuscripts. It is part of a larger project to bring together all surviving leaves of the manuscript, divided among four different countries, into a virtual whole, and to provide access at every level from the general reader to the most advanced scholar. [read more]

project: City in Film: Liverpool's urban landscape and the moving image

While the relationship between film and cities has been widely explored in research on architecture, urban space and the moving image, there have been no sustained place-based studies in which representations drawn from a range of filmic genres and practices are historically situated within their social, spatial and architectural context. The principal objective of the City in Film project is the compilation of database catalogue of films made in and about Liverpool, with a particular emphasis on the city's historical urban landscape. [read more]

project: A digital edition of the Vernon Manuscript (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Eng.poet.a.1)

The Vernon Manuscript (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Eng. poet.a.1) is the biggest and most important surviving late medieval English manuscript. An extensive collection of Middle English religious literature (and some French and Latin), and lavishly illuminated, it is potentially an incomparable resource for art historians, codicologists, palaeographers, literary and cultural historians, linguists, and editors. However, access is currently extremely limited for conservation reasons and because of the sheer scale of the volume (the text is two and a half as long as Tolstoy's War and Peace). [read more]

project: A typology of defectiveness

An important design feature of language is the ‘productive pattern’. We have enjoy ~ enjoyed, agree ~ agreed, and many others. Even if the pattern is not fully regular, there will be a form available, as in understand ~ understood. Surprisingly, this principle is sometimes violated, a phenomenon known as ‘defectiveness’, which means there a gap in a word’s set of forms. [read more]

project: Photographs Exhibited at the Royal Photographic Society 1870-1915

This is a resource enhancement project that has created a browsable and searchable database of historic photographic exhibition catalogues, supplemented by scans of the catalogue pages, contemporary reviews and illustrations of the exhibits. The most comprehensive records of photographic exhibitions for the latter part of the 19th century are those of the Photographic Society of Great Britain, London, which, after 1870, are published in full in The Photographic Journal. [read more]

project: 1641 Depositions

The aim of this three-year project (2007-2010) is to transcribe and digitise the ‘1641 Depositions’, a unique historical source housed in the TCD Library, The collection comprises some 3,100 personal statements, in which mainly protestant men and women of all classes told of their experiences at the outbreak of the rebellion by the catholic Irish in 1641. This material, collected by government-appointed commissioners over the course of a decade, runs to approximately 19,000 pages. [read more]

project: The Italian Academies 1530-1650: a themed collection database

The project promotes and facilitates research on the Italian learned Academies of the late Renaissance and early modern periods and their relationship to book production, printing and publishing in this period. The precise aim is to compile a comprehensive database of information relating to the membership and activities of Academies in Bologna, Naples, Padua and Siena and their links to the book trade as represented in the holdings of the British Library. The database is designed and developed as one of the BL Themed Collections series. [read more]

project: The decipherment, description and online accessibility of 16,500 medieval Hebrew and Judaeo-Arabic Genizah manuscripts

The project deciphers, describes, and digitises the medieval manuscripts from the Taylor-Schechter Genizah Collection at Cambridge University Library. The project describes and digitises around 16,500 items, creates bibliographic information, publishes catalogues, and provides access to descriptions, bibliographic information, and images online. The project gives scholars of religion, language, literature, culture, and history greater opportunity to study material from the collection. [read more]

project: Semantic Tools for Archaeological Resources

Increasingly within archaeology, the Web is used for dissemination of datasets. This contributes to the growing amount of information on the ‘deep web’, which a recent Bright Planet study estimated to be 500 times larger than the ‘surface web’. However Google and other web search engines are ill equipped to retrieve information from the richly structured databases that are key resources for humanities scholars. Important archaeological results and reports are also appearing as grey literature, before or instead of traditional publication. [read more]
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